Calcium-Rich Greens


After writing my Got Milk? post, I went to the grocery store on a mission to buy produce that was specifically rich in calcium. It is great that I am eating all the right foods so that my body can heal as best as it can, but I wanted to try and do an even better job of making calcium more bio-available to my body in case it needed it. I know that cooked dark greens are great calcium-rich choices. I’ve always loved kale, but thought that straying from the usual and giving it more variety could do my body good. So I went back to my Southern roots: collards and turnip greens.




Just one cup of cooked collard greens has 220 milligrams of calcium. Turnip greens have 99 milligrams of calcium per cup when cooked. Adding these rich greens into my meals along with my everyday cooked kale which has 93 milligrams of calcium per cup isn’t bad at all! I found these calcium milligram measurements on Eat Drink Paleo. I also picked up some broccoli and okra which also made the calcium-rich list.

For dinner last night, I boiled a pot of water and added the greens in it. I opted for the frozen bags because not only were they cheaper, but they are super splint-friendly in the kitchen. 😉 No chopping required, which means no ambidextrous skills needed from me!



I let the greens simmer in the hot water for about 10 minutes and then drained them. While my greens were draining, I browned some veal that Hubs had put in the freezer a few weeks ago.




I’ve never had veal. It was so juicy and tender; plus it smelled so good while browning on the cast iron.


I removed the veal after it browned and cut them into slices. I then added the greens to the skillet and poured a cup or two of my home made bone broth in for the greens to simmer in. I also like to think that the nutrient dense bone broth enhanced my dinner to give me super healing powers.



I then added the slices of veal back into the broth-simmering greens and covered it up for just a couple of minutes.



Then dinner was served! I think pork would have been a perfect pairing with the cooked greens, but we didn’t have any in the house at the time. The veal was pretty damn good too! I have my second follow up appointment with the orthopedic specialist tomorrow morning and I don’t think I have ever been this excited to go to the doctor’s! I am really hoping I can get my splint off after tomorrow. That would mean it would come off a week earlier than the doctor said, but I am very optimistic about my recovery and from what my body is telling me, I am feeling great! Fingers crossed!


Bone Broth


I have been waiting very patiently all weekend for my bone broth to brew. Since this was my first batch, I was a little intimidated by the challenge and I have been waiting for the right time to make it. Nothing like a broken bone to make brewing bone broth on the top of your agenda. Bone broth is exceptionally healthy for the body and is also known for helping with bone formation, growth and repair. Whole9 states:

“Bone broth is a source of minerals, like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium,  and potassium, in forms that your body can easily absorb. It’s also rich in glycine and proline, amino acids not found in significant amounts in muscle meat (the vast majority of the meat we consume). It also contains chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, the compounds sold as supplements to reduce inflammation, arthritis, and joint pain. Finally, “soup bones” include collagen, a protein found in connective tissue of vertebrate animals, which is abundant in bone, marrow, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments.  (The breakdown of collagen in bone broths is what produces gelatin.)”

See, why I was in dire need of some bone broth in my life? I had Hubs run by Whole Foods so I could pick up some beef bones last week; it was the very next day after my vehicle collision. I got about 2 lbs of beef marrow bones for 6 bucks. I figured for my first batch this would be perfect. I roasted the bones first, which was recommended by many on the Whole30 Forum.


I didn’t roast them very long. Just long enough for me to dice and cut all of my veggies. This was also a great way to get ride of some prime real estate in the fridge, especially since some of my veggies were on their last breath.

veggiesbrothI chopped up onions, carrots, celery, garlic, parsley and ginger root. I threw some rosemary, bay leaf and red pepper flakes in there too.

broth water


I added the bones, some apple cider vinegar, and filled the slow cooker up with water. I didn’t fuss with measurements; I just added enough water to fill it to the top. Many recommended to use filtered water, but I decided to keep it simple for my first attempt.

brothcookI covered my bone bath on Thursday night and didn’t unplug the crock pot until Sunday afternoon. There were many resources on how long to cook broth for. I’ve read where some only cook for 12 hours but also read that some say that with beef you can go up to 72 hours. I kept my cooking around 50-60. Unfortunately my crock pot may have been too hot at times. I came home Friday after work to see it bubbling, which probably wasn’t a good thing. I would then play around with my pot to change its settings between cooking on low and then turning it off. I could never get it to not stop bubbling after a while so I just settled with my bubbling bone broth. Besides, I still needed to buy a mesh strainer at the store since I didn’t have one!


My bone bath “shrunk” when I took the top off finally. The water volume had definitely decreased. The smell was rich and warm though.

broth strain

I waited till the broth had cooled a little, but it was still very warm when I used my fancy new mesh strainer. I had to get Hubs to help pour the broth out of the crock pot since I only had one arm.


The broth had the most beautiful dark color. I was quite surprised at how dark it actually was. You definitely don’t see broth like that come out of a package you buy from the store.


After the broth cooled, the fat congealed on the top. It was super easy to skim the fat off the top. I was a a bit disappointed to see that my broth didn’t become gelatinous like many would say it would. I’m afraid my crock pot gave it too much heat. Afterwards, I did some trouble shooting to find that most broths made in a crock pot don’t gel because of this problem. I am comforted by the fact that though the broth didn’t gel, it is still super nutritious. I was also a little confused as to why the volume of my bone bath decreased so much. This was also probably due to the high heat of the crock pot. I am going to still write this first time project as a success though because the broth was so deliciously smooth and flavorful! I’ve enjoyed a mug at night after dinner which just makes such a good ending to the day.



For more bone broth readings that I’ve used visit:

The Whole9 Bone Broth FAQ

Nom Nom Paleo’s Slow Cooker Beef Bone Broth

Wellness Mama’s Homemade Bone Broth Tutorial

Whole30 Forum

Rubies & Radishes Slow Cooker Beef Broth



Curve Ball


Well my week sure did get a huge curve ball thrown at it (you can thank my Red Sox-loving-husband for the baseball analogy)….maybe more actually like my whole entire month of April. I was unfortunately rear ended on Tuesday night coming home from band rehearsal. I am not going to get too much into the details because #1) I am kind of sick of talking about it and #2) it is difficult to type for me due to my fractured elbow. I will just say that while it was a pretty traumatic episode; it could have been very much worse and I am lucky to be at home typing this awkwardly with the right side of the laptop propped on a pillow and my left arm in a splint. I was given good news at the orthopedic specialist that my fracture should heal quickly in a couple of weeks and I won’t need a cast (Hallelujah!).

It is so crazy because right after my collision I didn’t think I needed to get checked out at the hospital. My left elbow bruised instantly and started swelling but my adrenaline was taking over. I then felt a bump on my forehead and started limping on my right leg and realized we better go to the ER just in case. Luckily we did because a few X-rays later showed a fractured elbow. I instantly thought of how lucky I was to be on this Whole30 program. Yes, finding out I had a broken bone sucked, but I took comfort in the fact that I was giving my body the best nutrients I could to help it work its magic! I also didn’t freak out like I thought I would about not being able to go to the gym to take high impact cardio and strength training classes during my body’s time of healing. My only plan is to give my body what it needs now: recovery through rest and nutrients. I can also thank the Whole30 for my peaceful mindset through this very stressful time.

So, what’s my plan? To keep on! I got up extra early this morning to give myself enough time to make my lunch and breakfast. I wasn’t sure how difficult it would be with one arm (more like one and a half since I can use my left hand). Chopping red leaf lettuce is difficult…or really any kind of produce. But the softer it is, the harder! Dicing the cucumbers for my salad was a bit easier since they are sturdier on the cutting board. I am learning to use my mouth as a second (third?) hand which works out quite nicely. I have always wanted to make homemade bone broth and now seems like the perfect time. I could definitely use the extra nourishment that the bone broth will have to offer. This is going to be my next “to do” task aside from all the insurance claims, doctor appointments, car shopping, etc. I made my husband take me to Whole Foods to pick up some beef bones while we ran errands yesterday. Now all I need to do is teach him how to put my hair into a decent looking pony tail….